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Highly Functional Semiconductor Lasers and Nanoimaging Applications

update:2018-12-17
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Features
We are pursuing the ultimate functions of semiconductor lasers and their application potentials. Concerning the application research aspect, development of advanced biomedical technologies, in which photonic methods play key roles, is an important issue. Such applied science field is called to be biophotonics, and a goal of our biophotonics research is to accomplish a high-resolution imaging for very deep sites of bio-tissues by employing nonlinear optical effects. Another important issue is the super-resolution "nanoimaging", which can provide nanometer-scale spatial resolution images by optical methods.
To realize the above functionalities, very advanced light sources are required. For example, features of ultrashort temporal duration, high peak-power, and broadband wavelength selectivity should be incorporated. With this background, we are developing highly functional light sources based on the semiconductor laser technologies; these light sources will be practical (real-world-use) ones, rather than just for scientific use. The core of our technology is the novel semiconductor laser, which can produce ultrashort and high-peak-power light pulses.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry
Regarding academic-industrial cooperative research subjects, we expect to produce novel functional light sources that are compact, stable, cost effective, and thus widely usable for real world applications. Advanced biomedical measurement and diagnostic systems with these light sources will be also developed.

Researchers

New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe)

YOKOYAMA, Hiroyuki , Professor
Doctor of Engineering

Keywords

Related Information

Patent
PULSE LASER BEAM GENERATING DEVICE
Japan Patent No. 3669634
U.S. Patent No.7,538,936 B2

Publication
“Visualizing hippocampal neurons with in vivo two-photon microscopy using a 1030 nm picosecond pulse laser,” R. Kawakami, K. Sawada, A. Sato, T. Hibi, Y. Kozawa, S. Sato, H. Yokoyama, and T. Nemoto, Sci. Reports, vol. 3, 1014, Jan.2013.
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