Tohoku University. Research Profiles

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"E" Theme - 15 Result(s)

E

 E

Eco-Material Processing

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Features

The major subject of our group is ferrous process metallurgy including thermodynamics of metals, alloys and molten slags, high temperature heterogeneous kinetics, phase equilibria of complex oxide systems and so on. We are interested in physic-chemical fundamentals of processing of metals, slags, scrap and waste. Recently our research interests are extended to multidisciplinary area so-called "Industrial Ecology" by the combination of process metallurgy, LCA (life cycle assessment) and social science such as econometrics.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Typically our research group is aggressively working in the area of material flow analysis of critical metals considering the quality of recycled materials. Currently our major research partners are steel and non-ferrous industries, while we do hope to collaborate with waste treatment company, mineral industry and an administrative organ.

Department of Metallurgy, Graduate School of Engineering
NAGASAKA Tetsuya, Professor Doctor of Engieering

Economics of Aging

Features

I investigate on the economics of aging, the optimal social welfare policy, low fertility and so on not based on the historical and systematic approach but based on the neo-classical economic theory. I also use econometric method and statistical approach. I often estimate the future projections of the population, public finance, magnitude of private markets, the results of public policies.
I also research on the comparative studies on East Asia (Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan) and European (especially Scandinavian countries). I provide statistic data and information on the economic and political systems on the aging in Japan.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

The future estimation on the financial status , market caused by low fertility and aging. The effective management of the medical institutions, social welfare systems, gender equality societies for the central and local government, research institutions, public enterprises, and financial Institutions.

Graduate School of Economics and Managemant
YOSHIDA Hiroshi, Professor

Electrical Detection of Magnetization Process in Nano-Scale Ferromagnet

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A nano-scale ferromagnet has onion and vortex states in its magnetization. Especially the vortex state is important since the stray field from the ferromagnet is suppressed. It is expected to apply it to high density non-volatile memory because of two different magnetized orientations, clock-wise and counter clock-wise directions. We have experimentally and theoretically confirmed that the chirality of the vortex state can be detected with an electrical way (Fig. 1). Furthermore, by putting a single nano-scale ferromagnet on top of a semiconductor Hall bar, we have demonstrated that the magnetization reversal process can be electrically detected with a very high sensitivity even without using SQUID (Fig. 2).

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

As an example of applications, the method is applicable to magnetic sensor with high sensitivity and high density non-volatile memory. We are prepared to provide academic consultations to companies interested in our research.

Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering
NITTA Junsaku, Professor Doctor of Engineering

Electrical Spin Generation and Manipulation in Semiconductors

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Since spin orbit interactions caused by the structural inversion asymmetry and the bulk inversion asymmetry induce an effective magnetic field in III-Vsemiconductor heterostructures, it is possible to realize the new functional devices based on the electrical control of the spin precession. We study the electrical spin generation by using spatial modulation of spin orbit interaction, which demonstrates Stern-Gerlach spin filter in semiconductors, and research ultra-fast spin dynamics by using time resolved Kerr rotation microscopy. We also investigate a spin MOSFET based on the perpendicular magnetic materials and electric-field induced magnetization control. We can reduce the leak current and the signal delay in the logic circuit. With the non-volatility of the ferromagnetic source and drain electrodes, random access memory is also enabled by using the spin MOSFET structure.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Target application will be low power logic devices and non-volatile memory based on electron spins and also future metal-based spintronic devices.

Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering
KOHDA Makoto, Associate Professor Doctor of Engineering

Electromagnetic Nondestructive Inspection System for Complicated Structures

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We develop sensing technologies, intelligent materials and evaluation technologies of materials for the optimization of maintenance for massive complex system such as energy plants. We work for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and monitoriing for complicated structures. We also develop the method for characterization of material degradation.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We want to work together with industries who are interested in nondestructive testing and material evaluation using applied electromagnetic methods.

Tohoku Forum for Creativity
TAKAGI Toshiyuki, Professor Doctor of Engineering

Electronic properties of nanostructures and nanodevices

Features

1) We investigate interesting properties of nanostructures and develop materials and devices utilizing nanostructures.
2) We have techniques and skills on low-noise electric measurements, cryogenics, nanofabrication, and data informatics. We are open to new collaborations.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Research Institute of Electrical Communication
OTSUKA Tomohiro, Associate Professor Doctor of Science

Elucidation of oncogenesis by Fbxw7

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In life science research field, it is noteworthy issue how information in genome is interpreted and is transferred to functional molecules. However, during these 10 years, we convinced that the amount of proteins, final functional molecules was regulated by not only by production but also by degradation. For examples, the amount of c-Myc, which promotes cell cycle and inhibits cell death, increase in many types of cancer by failure of protein degradation.
We have generated model mice in which function of Fbxw7, inducer of c-Myc degradation is suppressed. We observed promotion of oncogenesis in these mice, suggesting that Fbxw7 is oncosuppressor gene. In other words, Fbxw7 has a great potential to regulate oncogenesis or progress of cancer. These molecules specified the target proteins for proteolysis suggesting that modification of these molecules leads to develop oncosuppressive therapy. We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company for a practical application of this knowledge in industry.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Graduate School of Medicine
NAKAYAMA Keiko, Professor Medical Doctor

Emergence in collective electrons in organic molecular materials

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The main research subjects in this group are the experimental investigations of the organic molecular conductors. The characteristic properties of the organic materials are multiple flexibilities owing to the assemble structure of nanometer-size molecules. This flexbility comes up recently for developing the organic electronic devices. We explore the fundamental electronic properties of the organic molecular materials which have wide range of the ground states from superconductivity to insulating states resulting from the strongly correlated electrons in the molecular pi-orbital. Such features are closely connected to flexible and multiple degrees of freedom in charge, spin, molecular latticeand molecules themselves. We are actively studying on the interesting and important issues in the condensed matter physics from the viewpoints of the characteristic flexbility of the organic molecular materials. We are prepared to provide academic consultations to companies interested in our research.

Low Temperature Condensed State Physics, Institute for Materials Research
SASAKI Takahiko, Professor Dr. Eng.

English Vocabulary and Word-Formation: Synchronic and Diachronic Approaches

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My main research fields are English vocabulary, word-formation, and morphology. English is unique in possessing very rich amount of high-quality corpora and also in functioning the first ‘world language' in history, engendering dialects of non-native speakers all over the world. Using these original features as our data source allows us to watch and experience the process of how words and morphemes appear, grow, mature, and disappear.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

My research could be useful for those interested in i) Construction and development of English dictionaries and corpora, ii) machine translation and language processing, iii) English education, and iv) coinages and naming in English

Graduate School of Information Sciences
NAGANO Akiko, Associate Professor

Establishment of Minimally Invasive Cell Therapy for Diabetes by Introducing Interdisciplinary Approach

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The islet transplantation is the ideal "minimum invasive" cell transplant therapy for the severe diabetic patients who are suffering with controlling the blood glucose levels. In this project, we try to have a cross organization among the advanced technologies in islet transplantation as one of the typical cases. Our chief objective is to construct the center of medical cell-engineering therapy as successful examples in Tohoku University. We are convinced that technical innovation through this project could contribute much more to the activation of medical industry based upon cell therapy.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We have already established effective academic-industrial alliances regarding our several projects including a development of new type of cell-isolation enzyme. However, we are still looking for possible candidates concerning a special device for cell transplantation and medical grade-pathogen free animals.

Graduate School of Medicine
GOTO Masafumi, Professor Doctor of Medicine

Exercising "Cultured" Myotubes!

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We succeeded in generating highly developed cultured C2C12 myotubes by manipulating intracellular Ca2+ transients with electric pulse stimulation (EPS), that are endowed with similar properties to in vivo skeletal muscle in terms of (1) excitation-induced contractile activity as a result of de novo sarcomere formation, (2) higher energy expenditure (as assessed by AMPK activation), and (3) improved insulin responsiveness (as assessed by exofacial myc-GLUT4 translocation assay).

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Taking advantage of our “in vitro Exercise Model", our innovation will be an excellent alternative for the animal experimentation that can be applicable for a wide array of skeletal muscle research including drug screen.

Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering
KANZAKI Makoto, Associate Professor PhD

Experimental Nuclear Physics

Features

1) Study of strangeness nuclear physics and hypernuclei with high energy electron/photon beams

2)加速器研究施設で収集される大量のデータ解析技術、
  荷電粒子、高エネルギー光子の測定技術、

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science
NAKAMURA Satoshi N., Professor Doctor of Science

Exploration of Innate Immune Regulators

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Innate immunity is the first line of defense against infectious microorganisms, and the basic mechanisms of this process, including pathogen recognition and immune response activation, are evolutionarily conserved. To screen pharmaceuticals that target innate immunity, we established an ex vivo culture system based on the innate immune response of Drosophila, which is highly useful for identifying immune regulators that act on human innate immunity. We use this system to search for compounds that regulate innate immunity.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Innate immunity is a good target for the development of immune regulators to suppress unwanted immune responses, such as septic shock, inflammatory diseases and autoimmunity.

Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences
KIKUCHI Haruhisa, Associate Professor

Exploring the change in fauna and flora from the results of the natural history of Tokugawa Japan

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The natural history as nomenclature and description flourished in the 18th and early 19th century in Western countries, while in Japan as an exception in non-Western world, a characteristic description system was developed in the same period. And thus vast information concerning the flora and fauna in Japan was collected and organized. We are to make use of the results of the natural history of Tokugawa Japan for the diachronic environmental Studies. Especially as for indicator species we extract and reclassify the reliable materials from the literature and documents of Edo era from the perspective of the current taxonomy. And we compare them carefully with the scientific achievements after Meiji era aiming to point out the environmental changes in Japan and its surrounding areas. For example, the drastic changes in some geese populations wintering in Japan correlate strongly with the damages to the environment given by the developments in Far Eastern Siberia by the Russian Empire and in the Kuril Islands by Japan. We are prepared to provide academic consultations to corporations interested in our research.

Graduate School of International Cultural Studies
SUZUKI Michio, Professor Ph.D.

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as a New, Non-Invasive Angiogenic Therapy

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Extracorporeal shock wave (SW) therapy was introduced clinically more than 20 years ago to fragment kidney stones, which has markedly improved the treatment of urolithiasis. We found that a low-energy SW (about 10% of the energy density that is used for urolithiasis) effectively increases the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cultured endothelial cells. Based on this in vitro study, we have initiated in vivo studies and have demonstrated that extracorporeal cardiac SW therapy with a low-energy SW up-regulates the expression of VEGF, induces neovascularization, and improves myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia, without any adverse effects in vivo. On the basis of promising results in animal studies, we performed a series of clinical studies in patients with severe coronary artery disease without indication of PCI or CABG, including, firstly, an open trial followed by a placebo-controlled, double-blind study. In both studies, our extracorporeal cardiac SW therapy improved symptoms, exercise capacity, and myocardial perfusion in patients with severe coronary artery disease. Importantly, no procedural complications or adverse effects were noted. The SW therapy was also effective in ameliorating left ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (MI) in pigs and in enhancing angiogenesis in hind-limb ischemia in rabbits. Based on these animal studies, we are also conducting clinical studies in patients with acute MI and in those with peripheral arterial disease. Thus, our extracorporeal cardiac SW therapy is an effective, safe, and non-invasive angiogenic approach in cardiovascular medicine and its indication could be extended to a variety of ischemic diseases in the near future.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

The treatment for severe angina pectoris was approved as a highly advanced medical treatment by Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan in 2010.
The low-energy SW therapy would be applicable to a wide range of diseases. Your inquiries about the collaborative research are always welcome.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine
SHIMOKAWA Hiroaki, Professor MD, PhD