Tohoku University. Research Profiles

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"N" Keywords - 89 Result(s)

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[N-acetylneuraminic acid]

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS),Muscular dystrophy,Distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV)/ hereditary inclusion body myopathy (hIBM)

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Distal myopathy with rimmed vaculoles (DMRV) / hereditary inclusion body myopathy (hIBM) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized clinically by the preferential involvement of the tibialis anterior muscle. It is known that the disease gene underlying DMRV is GNE, encoding glucosamine (UDP-N-acetyl)-2- epimerase and N-acetylmannosamine kinase, two essential enzymes in sialic acid biosynthesis. Decreased sialic acid production causes muscle degeneration. Muscle atrophy and weakness are completely prevented in a mouse model of DMRV after treatment with sialic acid metabolites orally.
The aim of this study is to investigate pharmacokinetics and safety of N-acetylneuraminic acid (figure) in patients with DMRV. N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-glycolylneuraminic acid in serum and urine are measured before and after oral administration of N-acetylneuraminic acid. We are prepared to provide academic consultations to companies interested in our research.

Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medicine
AOKI Masashi, Professor Doctor of Medicine

[Nano Particles]

Advanced Functional Materials and Nanotechnology for Post-Lithium ion Battery

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Monoatomic layered materials of Graphene, Transition metal sulfide nanosheet, nanocrystalline active materials, nanoparticles and nanoporous materials are investigated for realizing high capacity, high power, high safety and low cost energy storage devices as a post- Lithium ion battery. Advanced chemistry of functional materials and device processes for All solid state battery, Magnesium battery, fuel cells, supercapacitor and wearable batteries are investigated.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Academia – Industry collaboration with manufacturing companies of functional materials, batteries, and also smart grid, renewable energy, electrical power companies are encouraged for developments of advanced energy materials and post-Lithium ion battery.


Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
HONMA Itaru, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Nano precision]

Nano-Precision Mechanical Manufacturing for Extreme Optics

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Through the fusion of technology and manufacturing techniques, the level of Japanese manufacturing has come to be regarded as exceptional. In order to survive in the current economic climate, research and development work in manufacturing processing technology must be promoted in order to develop ultra-high-precision mechanical manufacturing technologies capable of producing structures having three-dimensional shapes with ultra-smooth surfaces and extremely precise form accuracy, as well as ultra-high-precision lithography technologies that will enable the creation of nano structures by adding and subtracting atoms or molecules with precise control. In our laboratory, we focus on the creation and development of new manufacturing principles and technologies for nano-precision mechanical manufacturing.
1. Fluctuation-Free / nano-precision grinding for free-form genaration,
2. Ultra-precise cutting for complex shape elements.

・ Strong Collaboration among Industry, Academia and Government
We believe that greater importance will be attached to cooperation among academic institutions and between academia and government in research, with the results being put to practical use through joint projects between academia and industry. The fundamental mission of our research group is to encourage joint research in industry. In addition, we frequently provide consultation regarding technological problems in various companies.

Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering
KURIYAGAWA Tsunemoto, Professor PhD (Engineering)

[Nano-carbon]

Synthesis of Novel Nano-Carbon Materials Using Nano-Space as a Reaction Field

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We are designing and developing novel nanocarbon materials together with their hybrids by controlling the reaction nano-fields for the syntheses of these materials. One example is fully tailored carbon nanotubes with uniform diameter and length. Another noteworthy material is zeolite-templated carbon which has structure regularity like zeolite and a surprisingly large surface area up to 4000 m2/g. In addition, we have recently developed a method for a complete coating of the entire surface of mesoporous silica with graphene layers.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We are trying to apply these unique nanomaterials to electronic device, electrochemical capacitors, lithium-ion batteries, hydrogen storage, biosensors and capsules for drug and gene delivery. We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company for a practical application of this technology in industry.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
KYOTANI Takashi, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Nano-magnetism]

Fabrication of Spintronics Materials by Artificial Nanostructure Control

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Our group works on the fabrication of materials and the fundamental study of physical phenomena for spintronics. Particularly, we are interested in magnetic ordered alloys, and fabricate nanolayered structures, tunnel junctions or composite device structures with those materials to investigate novel magnetic and magnetotransport properties. Recently we are also interested in the correlation between spin and heat currents, and investigate novel thermo-electric phenomena.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company for a practical application of new spintronic devices with low energy consumption and thermoelectric devices for energy harvesting.

Magnetic Materials Laboratory, Institute for Materials Research
TAKANASHI Koki, Professor Doctor of Science

[Nano-rheology]

Development of Nano-Interface Chemistry for Materials Sciences Using Surface Forces Measurement

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Our research aims at developing methods, including instrumentation, for characterizing surface (or interface) at the nano-meter level. Most of our research subjects are related to the surface forces measurement, which can directly monitor the interaction between two surfaces. We study phenomena occurring at the solid-liquid interface such as adsorption and structuring of liquids. We have developed the resonance shear measurement which is a sensitive method for evaluating properties of confined liquid for nano-rheology and tribology. Twin-path surface forces apparatus we developed enabled us to study wide variety of samples such as metals, ceramics and plastics.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

These methods are applicable for characterizing lubricants, nano-materials, paints, sealants, and cosmetics. We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company for a practical application of this technology in industry.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
KURIHARA Kazue, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Nano-Tribology]

Development of Nano-Interface Chemistry for Materials Sciences Using Surface Forces Measurement

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Our research aims at developing methods, including instrumentation, for characterizing surface (or interface) at the nano-meter level. Most of our research subjects are related to the surface forces measurement, which can directly monitor the interaction between two surfaces. We study phenomena occurring at the solid-liquid interface such as adsorption and structuring of liquids. We have developed the resonance shear measurement which is a sensitive method for evaluating properties of confined liquid for nano-rheology and tribology. Twin-path surface forces apparatus we developed enabled us to study wide variety of samples such as metals, ceramics and plastics.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

These methods are applicable for characterizing lubricants, nano-materials, paints, sealants, and cosmetics. We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company for a practical application of this technology in industry.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
KURIHARA Kazue, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Nanocrystalline alloy]

Development of Soft Magnetic Materials and Magnet Consisting of Complete Rare-Earth Free Elements Both with Ultimately-High-Efficient Types Contributing to Energy- and Resource-Saving by Precise Controlling their Nanostructures

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Features and Originalities
Research activities include high functionalization and attachment of additional values to the soft magnetic materials of iron-group based metallic glasses, nanocrystalline and amorphous alloys and magnets, both from non-equilibrium alloys with useful properties that have not been achieved by conventional crystalline alloys. Recent successful results contain newly-developed nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys with high saturation magnetic flux density of 1.8 Tesla or higher and low core loss of ~1/3 to that of the Silicon steels and fabrication of rare-earth free L10-FeNi magnets.

Possible Academic/Industrial Collaborations
The target materials possess high potential as industrial materials owing to Fe-based alloy with low material costs accompanied by rare-earth-free nature and to producibility in an air environment. Expectations are contributions to energy-saving, saving mineral resources and reducing carbon dioxide emissions through collaborations with companies dealing with materials and applications.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

New Industry Creation Hatchery Center
MAKINO Akihiro, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Nanocrystals]

Developing energy creation and saving materials

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Most innovations have been triggered by advent of new materials. We focus on to explore new inorganic materials and their synthesis routes on the basis of our knowledge about the material design and various materials processing technologies. We develop proton conducting phosphate glasses working at intermediate temperatures and narrow gap oxide semiconductors applicable in visible and NIR regions, simple and safe synthesis routes to cadmium-free quantum dot phosphors and colloidal indium arsenide quantum dots for solar cells. Thin-film solar cells, fuel cells and light-emitting devices using those materials are also developing.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We focus on oxide semiconductors, proton conducting electrolytes and electrodes, quantum dots and nanocrystals in order to apply them in solar cells, fuel cells, light-emitting devices and displays. But, applicable area of our technologies is not limited in those applications.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM)
OMATA Takahisa, Professor Doctor of Engineering

 n

[nano particle]

Monomer-Recycle System of Biodegradable Plastics by Industrial Fungal Fermentation and Application of Fungal Biosurfactant Proteins to Nanoparticles for Medical Use

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In Japan, solid-phase fungal fermentation systems using the industrial fungus Aspergillus oryzae have been extensively used for producing fermented foods such as soy sauce and sake; the annual production volume of the products is over one million tons. The efficient enzymatic hydrolyzing systems are expected to be applicable to biological recycling of biodegradable plastics. We found that A. oryzae can effectively degrade polybutylene succinate-coadipate (PBSA) by the combination with an esterase (cutinase) CutL1 and novel surfactant proteins, RolA and HsbA that are attached to the surface of PBSA and then recruit CutL1. The recruitment of Cutl1 by the surfactants stimulated PBSA degradation.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

The fungal biosurfactant protein is applicable to industrial recycling of biodegradable plastics and to production of immune-response free nano-particles for medical use.

Graduate School of Agricultural Science
ABE Keietsu, Professor Doctor of Agriculture

[nano pigments]

Fabrication of The Novel Designed Nanodrugs Composed of Poorly Water-Soluble Compounds

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One of our major research focuses is to design the novel drug nanoparticles, so called “Nano-prodrugs”, and to apply them as anticancer drugs or eye drops with excellent delivery efficiency. Nano-prodrugs are constructed by synthetic prodrugs molecules which contains poorly water-soluble substituent. They could be fabricated to nanoparticles with 100 nm or less in size by our reprecipitation technique, which has been used to create organic nanomaterials. We are aiming at practical application of our Nano-prodrugs in the near future.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Our reprecipitation technique for fabricating organic nanomaterials is a versatile technique that can be applied to various organic molecules as well as drug compounds. We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company on controlling and evaluating properties of the organic nanoparticles.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
KASAI Hitoshi, Professor Doctor of Science

[nano structure]

Hierarchy Control in Structure and Creation of Novel Properties in Nano Scale Materials

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Crystals produced from the building blocks using a concept of geometrical materials, from the ubiquitous elements such as B, C, N, O, Si, Ge and 3-d elements show the following characteristics:
(1) Special properties resulting from the bonding nature and geometrical symmery.
(2) New properties expected from confinement and interface.
(3) A variety of phonons as phonon engineering.
(4) Interplay among phonons, itinerant electrons and magnons.
Materials are synthesized using the strategy of natural aboundant ubiquitous elements for safety. Novel properties can be expected for advanced electronic devices. The structure of new materials can accurately be determined by various experimental techniques.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

New materials produced by employing a new concept beyond the conventional methods can promote a new materials science for future electronics. Our research covers nano materials consisting of organic to innorganic elements. Thermoelectric materials for energy conversion and high mobility materials via Dirac quantum statse will be avialable for future electronic materials.

WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research
TANIGAKI Katsumi, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[nano-drugs]

Fabrication of The Novel Designed Nanodrugs Composed of Poorly Water-Soluble Compounds

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One of our major research focuses is to design the novel drug nanoparticles, so called “Nano-prodrugs”, and to apply them as anticancer drugs or eye drops with excellent delivery efficiency. Nano-prodrugs are constructed by synthetic prodrugs molecules which contains poorly water-soluble substituent. They could be fabricated to nanoparticles with 100 nm or less in size by our reprecipitation technique, which has been used to create organic nanomaterials. We are aiming at practical application of our Nano-prodrugs in the near future.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Our reprecipitation technique for fabricating organic nanomaterials is a versatile technique that can be applied to various organic molecules as well as drug compounds. We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company on controlling and evaluating properties of the organic nanoparticles.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
KASAI Hitoshi, Professor Doctor of Science

[nano-imaging]

Highly Functional Semiconductor Lasers and Nanoimaging Applications

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We are pursuing the ultimate functions of semiconductor lasers and their application potentials. Concerning the application research aspect, development of advanced biomedical technologies, in which photonic methods play key roles, is an important issue. Such applied science field is called to be biophotonics, and a goal of our biophotonics research is to accomplish a high-resolution imaging for very deep sites of bio-tissues by employing nonlinear optical effects. Another important issue is the super-resolution "nanoimaging", which can provide nanometer-scale spatial resolution images by optical methods.
To realize the above functionalities, very advanced light sources are required. For example, features of ultrashort temporal duration, high peak-power, and broadband wavelength selectivity should be incorporated. With this background, we are developing highly functional light sources based on the semiconductor laser technologies; these light sources will be practical (real-world-use) ones, rather than just for scientific use. The core of our technology is the novel semiconductor laser, which can produce ultrashort and high-peak-power light pulses.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Regarding academic-industrial cooperative research subjects, we expect to produce novel functional light sources that are compact, stable, cost effective, and thus widely usable for real world applications. Advanced biomedical measurement and diagnostic systems with these light sources will be also developed.

New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe)
YOKOYAMA Hiroyuki, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[nano-scale analysis of materials]

Analysis and Function Elucidation of Fine Clusters and Defects in Materials Invisible by Electron Microscopy

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It is well known that nano-scale impurity/solute clusters, defects, defect clusters and their complexes affect the mechanical and electrical properties in materials. However, it is very difficult to observe these objects even by state-of-the-art electron microscopes. We overcome the difficulty by employing noble two techniques: laser three-dimensional atom probe (3D-AP) technique and positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS). Laser 3D-AP can map out each atom in various materials (metals, semiconductors, insulators) in three-dimensional real space with nearly atomic scale resolution. PAS can detect vacancy-type defects and defect-impurity complexes very sensitively.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

By combining these methods, we are going to reveal the functions of the fine impurity clusters and defects to the materials: developments of new nano-structured materials, the mechanism of degradation of aged structural materials, the fall in the yield of semiconductor device production, and developments of quantum devices etc.

Institute for Materials Research
NAGAI Yasuyoshi, Professor PhD

[nanocomposite]

Magnetic Materials (Permanent Magnets, High Frequency Materials, Microwave Absorbers)

Features

The objectives of my researches are the development of high performance magnets and improvement of their magnetic properties. I have already developed following high performance magnets, such as Nd-Fe-B magnets using didymium, Sm-Fe-N high coercive powders prepared by HDDR and Fe-Cr-Co magnets. Recently, I have studied about the reduction of Dy content in Nd-Fe-B magnets for the use of HEV and have succeeded to develop high coercive Dy-free Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets by decreasing the grain size. I have also developed new kinds of microwave absorbers for the use in the frequencies of GHz range using permanent magnetic materials or nanoparticles.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

High performance magnetic materials can be used in many applications in automobile, home electronics, IT and medical industries. We hope to conduct collaborative researches with companies producing magnetic materials for the use in these applications, which aims to improve magnetic properties or to develop new magnetic materials.

Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering
SUGIMOTO Satoshi, Professor Doctor of Engineering

Multi-functionalization of composite materials by microstructure design

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For further social development, it is required the miniaturization, weight saving, high performance of various devices. We study on fiber, particle reinforced polymer, metal, ceramic matrices composite materials using our knowledge about materials mechanics and numerical simulation such as finite element method. We recently address to develop multi-functionalized composite materials, which have high strength, super lightweight, energy harvesting function, damage monitoring function, biodegradable at the same time.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Department of Materials Processing, Graduate School of Engineering
KURITA Hiroki, Assistant Professor Doctor of Engineering

[nanodevice]

Development of Innovative Green Nanodevices Using Damage-Free Processes

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We developed an entirely new concept of "bio-template ultimate process technology" and realized fabrication of uniform, size-controllable, defect-free, high-density and regularly-distributed quantum dot array on surface of arbitrary material. The quantum dot array can be applied to high efficiency and inexpensive quantum dot solar cells, high luminescence quantum dot lasers, high-speed graphene / germanium transistors, and so on, i.e., energy-generating, energy-storing, and low-energy-consumption devices.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We can accept collaborative researches on nanodevices such as quantum dot solar cells or lasers, low-energy-consumption devices such as graphene transistor and germanium transistor, and fundamental technologies such as plasma/beam processes, thin film deposition, doping, and surface treatment.

Green Nanotechnology Laboratory, Innovative Energy Research Center, Institute of Fluid Science
SAMUKAWA Seiji, Professor Doctor of Engineering

Electronic properties of nanostructures and nanodevices

Features

1) We investigate interesting properties of nanostructures and develop materials and devices utilizing nanostructures.
2) We have techniques and skills on low-noise electric measurements, cryogenics, nanofabrication, and data informatics. We are open to new collaborations.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Research Institute of Electrical Communication
OTSUKA Tomohiro, Associate Professor Doctor of Science

[nanoimaging]

Development of Vector Beam and its Application to Nanoimaging

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Vector beams are very attractive because of their unique features such as small spot formation and strong longitudinal electric field near focus. We are developing a variety of generation methods of vector beams including Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel-Gaussian beams and their higher order transverse modes. For instance, a smaller spot by approximately 30 % than that by a linearly polarized beam has been demonstrated and applied for nanoimaging.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Confocal scanning microscpy will benefit from vector beams as enhancement of spatial resolution. Otherwise, precision nano-processing will be possible. We are prepared to provide academic consultations to companies interested in our research.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
SATO Shunichi, Professor Doctor of Engineering