Tohoku University. Research Profiles

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"O" Keywords - 55 Result(s)

O

 o

[organic semiconductor]

Advanced Technology on Flexible Liquid Crystal Displays

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Flexible liquid crystal displays using thin plastic film substrates instead of glass substrates contained in current liquid crystal displays, are bendable, thin, lightweight, and do not crack, and generate new usage styles and human interfaces due to their excellent storability and portability. We have been researching the basic technologies for large-screen and high-quality flexible displays using functional organic materials including liquid crystal and polymer, so that anyone can enjoy fertile information services.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company in industry, for development and practical application of the advanced flexible display technologies.

Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering
FUJIKAKE Hideo, Professor Ph. D.

[organic-inorganic hybrid material]

Photo-Functional Advanced Materials for Nanofabrication by Nanoimprint Lithography

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Nakagawa group has dedicated to pursue scientific principles for molecular control of interface function occurring at polymer/other material interfaces and to put them into practice in nanoimprint lithography promising as a next generation nanofabrication tool. We are developing advanced photo-functional materials such as sticking molecular layers for "fix by light", UV-curable resins and antisticking molecular layers for "preparation by light", fluorescent resist materials for "inspection by light", and hybrid optical materials "available to light" and new research tools such as mechanical measurement systems to evaluate release property of UV-curable resins.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Our research aims at creating new devices to control photon, electron, and magnetism.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
NAKAGAWA Masaru, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[oxide]

A novel crystal growth via controlling an energy relationship between crystal and melt with applying an electric field

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This lab is concerned with the novel approach mainly for the growth from melt by studying the relationship between the interface dynamics during growth and properties of grown crystals. Special interests lie in the growth of new crystals via the imposition of an interface-electric field. Nano-scaled control of crystal growth is executed in an electric double layer of ~nm thickness that is induced by applying an external electric field on the growth interface. Some of our growth results brought by applying an electric field are;
1. Growth of Langasite-type crystals for the pressure sensor at high temperature by manipulating the energy relationship between crystal and melt.
2. Easy nucleation of protein crystals that are normally hard to crystallize.
3. Formation of Si crystals with desired structure by manipulating the interface instability of Si.
Crystals developed this way will widen an opportunity to collaborate with industries in the field of the piezoelectric, magnetic, optic and other fields related to the highly-networked information society.

Institute for Materials Research
UDA Satoshi, Professor Ph.D.

[oxide semiconductors]

Development of Interconnect Materials and Processes for High Performance and High Reliability Electric Devices

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Electronic products can be operated not only by semiconductors but also by metal interconnections attached to the semiconductors. Required properties for the metal interconnections are ohmic contact, diffusion barrier property, adhesion with semiconductors, and low resistivity, corrosion resistance, process reliability. Our group has committed ourselves to develop new metals and processes to meet the needs of wide-ranged device producers with consideration of cost performance. Topics of our research include (1) Cu alloys to self-form a diffusion barrier layer in multilayer interconnection of Si devices, (2) Cu alloys to form a reaction-doping layer in IGZO oxide semiconductors, (3) Nb alloys to achieve mechanical and thermal reliability with good ohmic property for SiC power devices, (4) Cu alloys for transparent conductive oxide such as ITO, (5) screen-printable Cu paste lines for solar cells, etc..

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Our research efforts are targeted at metallization and interconnections for advanced LSI, flat panel displays, touch panels, power modules, solar cells, and other electronic devices. Collaborators include material producers, equipment vendors, and device producers in the entire value chain of electronic products.

Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering
KOIKE Junichi, Professor PhD

Developing energy creation and saving materials

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Most innovations have been triggered by advent of new materials. We focus on to explore new inorganic materials and their synthesis routes on the basis of our knowledge about the material design and various materials processing technologies. We develop proton conducting phosphate glasses working at intermediate temperatures and narrow gap oxide semiconductors applicable in visible and NIR regions, simple and safe synthesis routes to cadmium-free quantum dot phosphors and colloidal indium arsenide quantum dots for solar cells. Thin-film solar cells, fuel cells and light-emitting devices using those materials are also developing.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We focus on oxide semiconductors, proton conducting electrolytes and electrodes, quantum dots and nanocrystals in order to apply them in solar cells, fuel cells, light-emitting devices and displays. But, applicable area of our technologies is not limited in those applications.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM)
OMATA Takahisa, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[oxygen consumption]

INSTRUMENT AND METHOD FOR ANALYZING METABOLIC CONDITION OF LIVING BODY AND RECORDING MEDIUM

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AIMS: The invention is to analyze metabolic condition, especially in oxygen consumption and energy production in the adipose tissues of human (Patent: JP 3848818).
PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide an instrument and method for analyzing the metabolism condition of a living body which is constructed in such a manner that it can measure the metabolism condition of a living body correctly and easily, and a recording medium.
SOLUTION: A metabolism condition analyzer is provided with an input means for inputting information about the body of a subject, a control means for processing this information and an output means for outputting results of the processing. The information consists of name, age, sex, race, height, weight, bioelectric resistance value and the date and time of measurement. A data file consisting the control means stores evaluation data of a metabolic condition which is previously determined by medical judgment based on a combination of an internal respiration index and oxygen consumption and energy production in adipose tissues. These are computed by calculating the value obtained by subtracting one from a body density calculated from the height, weight of the subject and the bioelectric resistance value and then multiplying the value. Welcome to your investment or co-operation.

Department of Diabetes Technology, Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering
NONOGAKI Katsunori, Professor MD, PhD

[oxygen saturation]

Visualization of Biological Microstructure with High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging

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"Features"
High-resolution imaging of biological tissue is non-invasively obtained with high frequency ultrasound. We have developed some ultrasound microscope systems which realized the resolution of 15-micron with 100 MHz and resolution to visualize a single cell with GHz range ultrasound. Ultrasonic imaging provides not only tissue morphology but also information on tissue elasticity. Recently, we have developed a real-time three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging system for visualization of subcutaneous micro vasculature and oxygen saturation.
"Targeted Application(s)/Industry"
High frequency ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging is repeatedly and non-invasively applied for early diagnosis of atherosclerosis, skin aging and tissue metabolism. They are useful for efficacy assessment of cosmetics and pharmaceuticals. High frequency ultrasound is also applied in the industrial areas where thickness measurement of opaque film or bilayer thin coating with the precision of 0.1 micron is required.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Biomedical Imaging Laboratory, Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering
SAIJO Yoshifumi, Professor PhD (Medicine)

 O

[Organic Thin Film]

Synthesis and material characterization of new organic ferroelectric materials, molecular semiconductors, molecular magnets.

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Multifunctional molecular-assemblies and hybrid organic - inorganic materials are examined from the viewpoint of structural freedom of organic molecules. The spin and electronic states of molecular-assemblies are designed in terms of electrical conductivity, magnetism, and ferroelectricity. Diverse molecular assemblies from single crystal, plastic crystal, liquid crystal, gel, to Langmuir-Blodgett film are our research targets, which were hybridized with inorganic gigantic clusters and metal nanoparticles. We are prepared to provide academic consultations to companies interested in our research.

Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
AKUTAGAWA Tomoyuki, Professor Doctor of Science

[Organization, Community]

Nonprofit Organizations and Social Capital

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Nonprofit organizations strive to solve community and social problems and to create new social values. Nonprofit organizations have the role to create citizenship and social capital - trust, norms and networks - in community. Social capital, an invisible and soft capital has increasingly become important to a sustainable management of an organization.
We hope to conduct collaborative research with willing corporations and organizations for measuring social capital at community/organizational levels and for making practical proposals on how to create and utilize social capital with viewpoints of partnership with nonprofit organizations and human resource development.

Graduate School of Economics and Management
NISHIDE Yuko, Professor Doctor of International Public Policy

[Organocatalysts]

Advanced Molecular Transformations by Organocatalysts

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The development of organic molecules which function as a catalyst has been extensively investigated to achieve selective and efficient transformation of organic molecules. Brønsted acids and bases are commonly employed as the catalyst in synthetic organic chemistry. To aim at their functionalization, axially chiral phosphoric acids and axially chiral guanidine bases have been developed as chiral Brønsted acid and base catalysts, respectively. A variety of optically active compounds has been synthesized through the development of highly stereoselective reactions using these catalysts.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

The development of chiral Brønsted acid and base catalysts has been accomplished as recoverable and reusable organocatalysts and highly stereoselective molecular transformations have been established using these catalysts. The present methodology is applicable to process chemistry in preparing medicines and relevant compounds on the basis of the selective and efficient molecular transformations thus developed with reduction of the waste material.

Graduate School of Science
TERADA Masahiro, Professor PhD

[Oxide electronics]

Oxide Electronics

Features

Our research group investigates creation of functional oxides and their functionalities. We synthesize thin films by pulsed laser deposition and sputtering methods and bulk specimens, and develop their novel synthetic routes. Recently, we are studying electrically conducting rare earth oxides, transparent room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors, and layered superconductors with monatomic Bi layer. We will develop our materials design by extending materials range and performing oxide heteroepitaxy.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Collaborative research in fields of oxide electronics with novel electric conducting oxides and oxide spintronics with ferromagnetic semiconductors and novel ferromagnetic oxides.

Advanced Institute for Materials Research
FUKUMURA Tomoteru, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Oxide Nano-particles]

Development of Solid-State-Ionics Materials for Energy Conversion, Storage and Utilization

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Our focus is on the development of solid-state-ionics materials to be used for a variety of energy conversion systems. To further improve the performance of fuel cells and lithium batteries, novel ionic conductors and mixed conductors with high ionic conductivity and chemical stability are highly demanded. We have been developing such the materials based on defect chemistry and thermodynamics of ceramics, and trying to apply those materials to actual energy conversion devices.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

To date, a hydrogen production system utilizing oxygen permeable membranes and an all-solid-state battery have been prepared.

Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering
TAKAMURA Hitoshi, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Oxide spintronics]

Oxide Electronics

Features

Our research group investigates creation of functional oxides and their functionalities. We synthesize thin films by pulsed laser deposition and sputtering methods and bulk specimens, and develop their novel synthetic routes. Recently, we are studying electrically conducting rare earth oxides, transparent room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors, and layered superconductors with monatomic Bi layer. We will develop our materials design by extending materials range and performing oxide heteroepitaxy.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Collaborative research in fields of oxide electronics with novel electric conducting oxides and oxide spintronics with ferromagnetic semiconductors and novel ferromagnetic oxides.

Advanced Institute for Materials Research
FUKUMURA Tomoteru, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Oxygen Permeable Membrane]

Development of Solid-State-Ionics Materials for Energy Conversion, Storage and Utilization

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Our focus is on the development of solid-state-ionics materials to be used for a variety of energy conversion systems. To further improve the performance of fuel cells and lithium batteries, novel ionic conductors and mixed conductors with high ionic conductivity and chemical stability are highly demanded. We have been developing such the materials based on defect chemistry and thermodynamics of ceramics, and trying to apply those materials to actual energy conversion devices.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

To date, a hydrogen production system utilizing oxygen permeable membranes and an all-solid-state battery have been prepared.

Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering
TAKAMURA Hitoshi, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Oxygen sensor]

Development of PHD-Targeted Drug for Ischemic Injury

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All the living organisms generate energy from molecular oxygen to maintain their own lives. Once the concentration of oxygen falls down, life activity gets severely hampered and it could sometimes cause death. Typical examples that are related to local hypoxia are ischemic heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.
We focus on the function of prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) as a sensor to detect the hypoxia, and we are developing drugs to treat ischemic injury by controlling hypoxia.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Currently, we have several compounds that inhibit the PHD. We want to commercialize in conjunction with pharmaceutical companies in Japan and overseas, advancing our non-clinical studies for clinical development.

Division of Molecular Medicine and Therapy, United Centers for Advanced Research and Translational Medicine (ART), Graduate School of Medicine
MIYATA Toshio, Professor M.D., PhD