Tohoku University. Research Profiles

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"S" Keywords - 160 Result(s)

S

 S

[self]

Brain Mechanism Realizing Human Mind

Features

I am investigating the brain mechanism of human mind. Specifically, my target is the internal schema that dissociate the self and other in the following three layers: physical, interpersonal, and social domains.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

  • Improvement of the interface of the system
  • Clarifying the neuro-cognitive mechanism of the effect on the customer
  • New concept of the customer satisfaction
  • Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer
    SUGIURA Motoaki, Professor MD PhD

[self-driving car]

Coexistence of humans and mobile robots

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Features

A variety of new mobilities coexisting with humans, such as service robots, self-driving cars, and personal mobility, are expected to be deployed. In this laboratory, we are studying technologies for the safe and smooth coexistence of these various mobile vehicles with humans.
In particular, we are approaching the problem from the aspect of predicting the movement of humans by considering their characteristics such as visual attention.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

The targeted application is service robots, personal mobility, self-driving cars, and other mobile vehicles that will be expected to coexist with humans, as well as the design of transportation environments for these vehicles to safely coexist with humans.

Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Robotics, Advanced Robotics, ..........
YUSUKE TAMURA, Associate Professor Docter

[self-healing concrete]

[Semiconductor]

Hands-On Access Fabrication Facility –Open Facility for MEMS and Semiconductor Prototyping–

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Features

We offer a hands-on-access fabrication facility for MEMS and semiconductor research and development. The facility is located at the 1800m2 clean room, Jun-ichi Nishizawa Memorial Research Center, Tohoku University, and started in 2010. The principle is an open access that users can utilize the fab and operate the equipment by themselves. Users also can access a great deal of know-how accumulated at Tohoku University. More than 260 companies have utilized the fab for developing various devices. To accelerate University's R&D and education, product fabrication by a company user is started in July 2013.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Our target is MEMS and semiconductor devices including sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope, pressure sensor, force sensor, photo diode, radiation sensor, microphone, bio sensor), solar cell, RF device, optical device, micro actuator. Process technology, such as etching, sputtering, oxidation/diffusion, CVD and bonding is also available.

Micro System Integration Center
TOTSU Kentaro, Professor Doctor of Engineering

Electronic properties of nanostructures and nanodevices

Features

1) We investigate interesting properties of nanostructures and develop materials and devices utilizing nanostructures.
2) We have techniques and skills on low-noise electric measurements, cryogenics, nanofabrication, and data informatics. We are open to new collaborations.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Research Institute of Electrical Communication
OTSUKA Tomohiro, Associate Professor Doctor of Science

[Semiconductor Integrated Circuit]

Development of Biomedical Micro/Nano Integrated System Using LSI Technology

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Features

Semiconductor neural engineering is a discipline that uses semiconductor process/device/circuit technologies to further understand properties of neural systems and to create novel fusion systems of living body and machine.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

One of the goals in this laboratory is to establish semiconductor neural engineering and develop biomedical micro/nano integrated systems.
Another goal is to educate the next generation of leaders in biomedical engineering through research including:
1. Intelligent Si neural probe and biomedical signal processing LSI
2. Fully-implantable retinal prosthesis system
3. Bio/nano technology and novel Bio-FET sensor
4. 3-dimensional integration technology and analog/digital LSI design

Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering
TANAKA Tetsu, Professor Ph.D. (Engineering)

[semiconductor laser]

Highly Functional Semiconductor Lasers and Nanoimaging Applications

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Features

We are pursuing the ultimate functions of semiconductor lasers and their application potentials. Concerning the application research aspect, development of advanced biomedical technologies, in which photonic methods play key roles, is an important issue. Such applied science field is called to be biophotonics, and a goal of our biophotonics research is to accomplish a high-resolution imaging for very deep sites of bio-tissues by employing nonlinear optical effects. Another important issue is the super-resolution "nanoimaging", which can provide nanometer-scale spatial resolution images by optical methods.
To realize the above functionalities, very advanced light sources are required. For example, features of ultrashort temporal duration, high peak-power, and broadband wavelength selectivity should be incorporated. With this background, we are developing highly functional light sources based on the semiconductor laser technologies; these light sources will be practical (real-world-use) ones, rather than just for scientific use. The core of our technology is the novel semiconductor laser, which can produce ultrashort and high-peak-power light pulses.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Regarding academic-industrial cooperative research subjects, we expect to produce novel functional light sources that are compact, stable, cost effective, and thus widely usable for real world applications. Advanced biomedical measurement and diagnostic systems with these light sources will be also developed.

New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe)
YOKOYAMA Hiroyuki, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[semiconductor lasers (LD)]

R&D in Semiconductor Materials and their Device Applications Bringing System Evolutions

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Features

1. Development of Distributed Feedback (DFB) Laser Diodes (LD) widely used in optical communications systems realizing a highly information-based society. This LD increases the transmission capacity by 25,000 times per fiber which means the bit rate of 10Tb/s.

2. Nitride semiconductors famous for blue light emitting diodes.
(a) Proposal of InGaAlN system considering device applications in 1989
(b) Success in growth of single crystalline InGaN by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) in 1989
(c) Prediction of band-gap energy (Eg) of InN much smaller than the values reported in 1980s and its   experimental confirmation in 2002
(d) Observation of photoluminescence from InGaN in 1991
(e) Prediction of phase separation in InGaAlN in 1997

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

DFB-LD: Fabrication of periodic structure with submicron scale, Epitaxial growth of semiconductor films on the substrate with fine structures, LD fabrication process, device evaluation, and device simulation

Nitride Semiconductors: MOVPE growth, N-polar growth, Evaluation of semiconductor materials, Fabrication of light-emitting devices, solar cells, and high-power transistors

New Industry Creation Hatchery Center
MATSUOKA Takashi, Professor Doctor of Engineering

[Semiconductor processing]

Development of Advanced Device and Process Technologies and New Image Sensors

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Features

Toward the ultimate performances of image sensors, advanced research activities are being conducted that cover a wide range of technology fields from cleanroom infrastructure, materials, process equipment, process, device, circuit, assembly, signal processing, measurement/evaluation and reliability. Following technologies have been successfully commercialized:
A fast and accurate measurement technology of electrical characteristics for over 1 million transistors
A wide dynamic range CMOS image sensor technology capturing images over five decade brightness ranges
An ultra-fast CMOS image sensor technology with 10 million frames/sec

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Followings are available for industry collaborators:
A. 200mm-diameter-wafer silicon device fabrication utilizing the ultra-clean facility including wafer mutual fabrication processing between device manufacturers.
B. Process technology development and various kinds of analyses.
C. Development of new image sensors.

Management Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering
SUGAWA Shigetoshi, Professor PhD

[Sensor]

Hands-On Access Fabrication Facility –Open Facility for MEMS and Semiconductor Prototyping–

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Features

We offer a hands-on-access fabrication facility for MEMS and semiconductor research and development. The facility is located at the 1800m2 clean room, Jun-ichi Nishizawa Memorial Research Center, Tohoku University, and started in 2010. The principle is an open access that users can utilize the fab and operate the equipment by themselves. Users also can access a great deal of know-how accumulated at Tohoku University. More than 260 companies have utilized the fab for developing various devices. To accelerate University's R&D and education, product fabrication by a company user is started in July 2013.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Our target is MEMS and semiconductor devices including sensors (accelerometer, gyroscope, pressure sensor, force sensor, photo diode, radiation sensor, microphone, bio sensor), solar cell, RF device, optical device, micro actuator. Process technology, such as etching, sputtering, oxidation/diffusion, CVD and bonding is also available.

Micro System Integration Center
TOTSU Kentaro, Professor Doctor of Engineering

Development of Passive Millimeter-wave Imaging Device for Practical Applications

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Features

Millimeter wave (MM-wave) which is one of the electromagnetic wave transparent the clothes, the fire and the wall etc. and all natural materials including objects in clothes always radiate the electromagnetic wave as the thermal noise. Using these characteristics of MM-wave, imaging of concealed objects in clothes can be accomplished in a noninvasive and noncontact manner. This technique is called Passive Millimeter Wave (PMMW) Imaging technique and we have developed a PMMW imaging device for security applications.

The wave length of MM-wave frequency range is from 1 mm to 10 mm and the spatial resolution of images in MM-wave range is low compared with sub-millimeter (terahertz) range or Infra-Red range, however, higher transmittance through clothes can be obtained compared with higher frequency range. Furthermore, low noise amplifier (LNA) exists which could be the advantage of MM-wave compared with higher frequency ranges.

Now the device was developed for the purpose of keeping safe and secure aircrafts and ships etc., we hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company for a practical application of this technology in industrial fields such as the fire rescue, the police equipment and the medical devices.

Graduate school of Engineering
SATO Hiroyasu, Assistant Professor Doctor of Engineering

MEMS/Micromachines and Microfabrication Technology

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Features

We are studying MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) and related technologies, which are typically used for the input/output of information/communication devices, the safety of automobiles etc. Our representative topics include integrated sensors, piezoelectric devices, RF MEMS, micro energy devices and wafer-level packages. Our facilities are open-accessible and well equipped with a lot of tools for lithography, dry/wet etching, thin film deposition, wafer bonding, device mounting and evaluations, which can be operated by each researcher. Using these tools, a variety of MEMS are being prototyped. Also, new microfabrication tools are being developed by ourselves.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We are collaborating with many companies, from which visiting researchers are dispatched to our laboratory. We also accept companies which want to just use specific tools in our facilities. Consultation is always welcome.

Department of Bioengineering and Robotics, Graduate School of Engineering
TANAKA Shuji, Professor Doctor of Engineering

Electromagnetic Nondestructive Inspection System for Complicated Structures

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Features

We develop sensing technologies, intelligent materials and evaluation technologies of materials for the optimization of maintenance for massive complex system such as energy plants. We work for electromagnetic nondestructive testing and monitoriing for complicated structures. We also develop the method for characterization of material degradation.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

We want to work together with industries who are interested in nondestructive testing and material evaluation using applied electromagnetic methods.

Tohoku Forum for Creativity
TAKAGI Toshiyuki, Professor Doctor of Engineering

Design, fabrication and test of high performance miniaturized sensor and actuator systems

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Features

Micro and nano electro-mechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) have completely changed human society in the past decades. Many devices that are taken for granted these days like smart phone, future car and drone would be unthinkable without them.
The integration of various new kinds of materials, such as metallic glass and nanostructures into micro technologies allows us to create devices with novel performance and characteristics; examples include acoustic sensors and actuators, thermoelectric generators and wafer level packages.
In collaboration with partners inside and outside Tohoku University, technologies are being developed that can be transferred to industry ranging from material integration and processes to packaging and reliability.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Wide collaboration in Microsystem technology is possible. We develop, implement and optimize processes, devices and systems until they are ready for use, keeping in mind reliability, yield and other important features for commercialization. We work with also with partners, such as Fraunhofer. Flexible interlinking of expertise and capacities with other research groups enables us to meet broad project requirements and create complex system solutions.

Advanced Institute for Materials Research
FROEMEL Joerg, Associate Professor Doctor of Engineering

Lymph node metastasis prediction and treatment evaluation system

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Features

1. pressure sensor (needle, optical fiber, etc.) can be inserted into the lymph node to evaluate the risk of lymph node metastasis and treatment.
2. domestic patent obtained

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Joint research with a medical device manufacturer to develop a diagnosis and treatment system for lymph node metastasis

Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering
KODAMA Tetsuya, Professor PhD (Engineering), PhD (Medicine)

[Service Engineering]

Data Analytics for Creation of Social Values

Features

My research field is a data analytics for creation of social values by data science approaches. In modern society, we can observe various data sets about our daily life, business or community. I aim to create new services for it using such data set and methods of Bayesian modeling, data mining or machine learning.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Graduate School of Economics and Management
ISHIGAKI Tsukasa, Associate Professor Doctor of Philosophy

[Shape memory alloy]

Novel Cu-Based Shape Memory Alloy with High Ductility

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Features

Recently, we have developed a novel Cu-Al-Mn based shape memory alloy with high SM properties and with a ductility twice higher than that in Nitinol . Furthermore, this novel SM alloy needs no die for the shape setting and is fabricated with relatively low cost. Very recently, we have successfully developed a device to cure ingrown toenail by using this SM alloy.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

Very recently, we established a fabrication process for the Cu-Al-Mn sheet, wire and bar with 0.1 - 20mm in thickness or diameter. We hope to conduct collaborative research with a willing company for a practical application with this new SM alloy.

Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering
KAINUMA Ryosuke, Professor Doctor of Engineering

newNovel CoCr-based superelastic metallic biomaterial with low Young's modulus

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Features

General metallic biomaterials, such as stainless steels and conventional CoCr alloys, show a high Young's modulus ten times higher than that of human bones. This is an unfavored feature because it causes the so-called "stress shielding effect" when they are used as implants. β-type Ti alloys have a relatively lower Young's modulus, but they come with a compromise of low wear resistance. The current novel CoCr-based alloys are a breakthrough; they exhibit both a low Young's modulus similar to human bones and a high wear and corrosion resistance. Moreover, they exhibit superelasticity with a huge recoverable strain over 17%, also showing promise as shape memory alloys.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

It is the first time that a low Young's modulus, a high corrosion and wear resistance, and a superior superelastic behavior are simultaneously obtained in a single material. The current novel CoCr-based alloys are promising for biomedical applications such as total hip or knee joint replacements, bone plates, spinal fixation devices, and vascular stents.

Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering
XU Xiao, Assistant Professor PhD

[Shockwave]

Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy as a New, Non-Invasive Angiogenic Therapy

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Features

Extracorporeal shock wave (SW) therapy was introduced clinically more than 20 years ago to fragment kidney stones, which has markedly improved the treatment of urolithiasis. We found that a low-energy SW (about 10% of the energy density that is used for urolithiasis) effectively increases the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cultured endothelial cells. Based on this in vitro study, we have initiated in vivo studies and have demonstrated that extracorporeal cardiac SW therapy with a low-energy SW up-regulates the expression of VEGF, induces neovascularization, and improves myocardial ischemia in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia, without any adverse effects in vivo. On the basis of promising results in animal studies, we performed a series of clinical studies in patients with severe coronary artery disease without indication of PCI or CABG, including, firstly, an open trial followed by a placebo-controlled, double-blind study. In both studies, our extracorporeal cardiac SW therapy improved symptoms, exercise capacity, and myocardial perfusion in patients with severe coronary artery disease. Importantly, no procedural complications or adverse effects were noted. The SW therapy was also effective in ameliorating left ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction (MI) in pigs and in enhancing angiogenesis in hind-limb ischemia in rabbits. Based on these animal studies, we are also conducting clinical studies in patients with acute MI and in those with peripheral arterial disease. Thus, our extracorporeal cardiac SW therapy is an effective, safe, and non-invasive angiogenic approach in cardiovascular medicine and its indication could be extended to a variety of ischemic diseases in the near future.

Targeted Application(s)/Industry

The treatment for severe angina pectoris was approved as a highly advanced medical treatment by Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan in 2010.
The low-energy SW therapy would be applicable to a wide range of diseases. Your inquiries about the collaborative research are always welcome.

Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine
SHIMOKAWA Hiroaki, Professor MD, PhD

[Si]

A novel crystal growth via controlling an energy relationship between crystal and melt with applying an electric field

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Features

This lab is concerned with the novel approach mainly for the growth from melt by studying the relationship between the interface dynamics during growth and properties of grown crystals. Special interests lie in the growth of new crystals via the imposition of an interface-electric field. Nano-scaled control of crystal growth is executed in an electric double layer of ~nm thickness that is induced by applying an external electric field on the growth interface. Some of our growth results brought by applying an electric field are;
1. Growth of Langasite-type crystals for the pressure sensor at high temperature by manipulating the energy relationship between crystal and melt.
2. Easy nucleation of protein crystals that are normally hard to crystallize.
3. Formation of Si crystals with desired structure by manipulating the interface instability of Si.
Crystals developed this way will widen an opportunity to collaborate with industries in the field of the piezoelectric, magnetic, optic and other fields related to the highly-networked information society.

Institute for Materials Research
UDA Satoshi, Professor Ph.D.